Quotes about Criticism

"Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgement."

William Shakespeare (baptised 26 April 1564; died 23 April 1616) was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.


"How much easier it is to be critical than to be correct."

Benjamin Disraeli (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881) was a British Prime Minister, parliamentarian, Conservative statesman and literary figure. He served in government for three decades, twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. He was the country's first and thus far only Prime Minister who was born Jewish.


"Any fool can criticize, condemn, and complain- and most fools do."

Dale Breckenridge Carnegie (November 24, 1888 – November 1, 1955) was an American writer and lecturer and the developer of famous courses in self-improvement, salesmanship, corporate training, public speaking and interpersonal skills.


"To avoid criticism do nothing, say nothing, be nothing."

Elbert Green Hubbard (June 19, 1856 – May 7, 1915) was an American writer, publisher, artist, and philosopher. He was an influential exponent of the Arts and Crafts movement.


"Cynicism is knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing.

Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing."

Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 1854 – 30 November 1900) was an Irish writer, poet, and prominent aesthete. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, he became one of London's most popular playwrights in the early 1890s. Today he is remembered for his many epigrams, his plays which are still revived, and the tragedy of his imprisonment and early death.


"Honest criticism, is hard to take, particularly from a relative, a friend, an acquaintance, or a stranger."

Franklin P. Jones (1908 - 1980) was a Philadelphia reporter, public relations executive and humorist.


"Do what you feel in your heart to be right-For you'll be criticized anyway. You'll be damned if you do, and damned if you don't."

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) the First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945. She supported the New Deal policies of her husband, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and became an advocate for civil rights.


"How much easier it is to be critical than to be correct."

Benjamin Disraeli (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881) was a British Prime Minister, parliamentarian, Conservative statesman and literary figure. He served in government for three decades, twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. He was the country's first and thus far only Prime Minister who was born Jewish.


"Pay no attention what the critics say. Remember a statue has never been set up in honor of a critic."

Jean Sibelius (8 December 1865 – 20 September 1957) was a Finnish composer of the later Romantic period whose music played an important role in the formation of the Finnish national identity. His mastery of the orchestra has been described as "prodigious".


"Flatter me, and I may not believe you. Criticize me, and I may not like you. Ignore me, and I may not forgive you. Encourage me, and I may not forget you."

Sir (William) Arthur Lewis (January 23, 1915 — June 15, 1991) was a Saint Lucian economist well known for his contributions in the field of economic development. In 1979 he won the Nobel Prize in Economics, becoming the first black person to win a Nobel Prize in a category other than peace.