Quotes about Possibilities

"Sometimes I have believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast."

Lewis Carroll, born: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898) was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer.


"The first time you do the impossible, it may take a little longer."

Sheila Kelley (born October 9, 1961) is an American television actress.


"I have learned to use the word 'impossible' with the greatest caution."

Hal Borland (May 14, 1900 – February 22, 1978) was a well-known American author.


"Some of the world's greatest feats were accomplished by people not smart enough to know they were impossible."

Doug Larson (born February 10, 1926) wrote a daily column for the Green Bay Press-Gazette and a weekly column for the Door County Advocate — both Wisconsin-based newspapers.


"DID is a word of achievement,
WON'T is a word of defeat,
MIGHT is a word of bereavement,
CAN'T is a word of defeat,
OUGHT is a word of duty,
TRY is a word each hour,
WILL is a word of beauty,
CAN is a word of power."

William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was the ninth President of the United States, an American military officer and politician, and the first president to die in office.


"The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore they attempt the impossible, and achieve it, generation after generation."

Pearl Sydenstricker Buck (June 26, 1892 — March 6, 1973) also known by her Chinese name Sai Zhenzhu was an award-winning American writer who spent most of her time until 1934 in China. Her novel The Good Earth was the best-selling fiction book in the U.S. in 1931 and 1932, and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1932.


"Only those who attempt the absurd can achieve the impossible."

Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 – 18 April 1955) was a theoretical physicist, philosopher and author who is widely regarded as one of the most influential and best known scientists and intellectuals of all time. A German-Swiss Nobel laureate, he is often regarded as the father of modern physics. He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to Theoretical Physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect".


"Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities. Truth isn't."

Mark Twain, born:Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910) was an American author and humorist. Twain is noted for his novels Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884), which has been called "the Great American Novel", and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876). Twain was a friend to presidents, artists, industrialists, and European royalty.


"Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination."

Bertrand Arthur William Russell (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970) was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, socialist, pacifist, and social critic.


"One never goes so far as when one doesn't know where one is going."

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer and polymath. Goethe is considered by many to be the most important writer in the German language and one of the most important thinkers in Western culture. Goethe's works span the fields of poetry, drama, literature, theology, philosophy, and science. His magnum opus, lauded as one of the peaks of world literature, is the two-part drama Faust.